Water pollution percussion: No more Flint water crisis!

The Flint water crisis is a drinking water pollution issue in Flint Michigan,  United States that took place in April 2014. After Flint changed its water supply from purified  Detroit Water and Sewerage Department water (which was sourced from Lake Huron as well as the Detroit River) to the Flint River (to which officials had failed to apply corrosion inhibitors), its drinking water had a series of problems that culminated with lead contamination, creating a seriouspublic health danger. The corrosive Flint River water caused lead from aging pipes to leach into the water supply, causing extremely elevated levels of the heavy metal neurotoxin. In Flint, between 6,000 and 12,000 children have been exposed to drinking water with high levels of lead and they may experience a range of serious health problems. Due to the change in water source, the percentage of Flint children with elevated blood-lead levels may have risen from about 2.5% in 2013 to as much as 5% in 2015. The water change is also a possible cause of an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in the county that has killed 10 people and affected another 77.

As Flint’s water crisis bulldozes forward, there is another Michigan city taking preemptive measures to protect its citizens from lead poisoning. Lansing’s Board of Water and Light has been replacing aging, lead-riddled water pipes with copper before a problem even starts. The local government working to prevent causing its citizens harm is leaving locals shocked.

It’s very important to prevent water pollution from the source ,but it’s also very important to avoid contaminate from the process of transportation,  otherwise it can do serious damage to both drinkers’ health and the water body.

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